Author Archives: Elias Munshya, LLB (Hons), MA., M.Div.

Indecent Discretion: Why Nchito’s “nolle” defies both law and common sense

E. Munshya, LLB (Hons), M.Div.

As a constitutional democracy, our republic must be led and controlled by both the written constitution and the unwritten spirit of constitutionalism. It would be ridiculous for officers of the state to go on a rampage abusing their discretion simply because the text of the constitution so says. It is dangerous to read or apply the text of our constitution without regard to important principles that undergird it. It would be wanton recklessness for our people to do stuff simply because the constitution says so. It can never be justified to do injustice to another simply because the rote text of the constitution so says. Beyond the written text, we must adhere to common sense, common sense of justice and the call of sanity rationed by a command of justice.

There are a number of officers in our republic who have been given the sacred duty to exercise discretion for the good of our democracy. This is a sanctified calling. It is a huge responsibility. Discretion is not an opportunity for selfishness, nepotism and tribalism. For example, the Head of State has discretion to choose a cabinet of her choice from among the Members of Parliament. She also has been given the discretion and prerogative to elect 8 individuals who should become members of our national assembly. The Head of State also exercises numerable other prerogatives. Indeed for our democracy to work, prerogatives must be had. Cabinet ministers also exercise some prerogatives. In some cases, these prerogatives are quite wide and often ambiguous. The Attorney General does have powers and prerogatives within her jurisdiction and so does the Director of Public Prosecutions. When it comes to the Zambia Revenue Authority Act, the Commissioner General has the prerogative to alter, change or make exceptions to taxes imposed on individuals, companies or corporations. Wouldn’t it be offensive to common sense if the Commissioner-General used this prerogative to exempt her personal companies from paying duty? If the Commissioner-General can’t be allowed to abuse her discretion in that manner, how on earth did Bo Mutembo get the guts to believe that he could walk into our sacred chambers and stop the prosecution of a case involving his own alleged criminal activities?

The exercise of state power, discretion, and prerogative is not just limited to the texts that empower these individuals. The exercise of these prerogatives is tied to the spirit of the constitution and the rule of law under whose guidance the said texts predicate. Several principles undergird the exercise of the prerogatives or discretions of state power. The first principle predicates from the idea that any officer of the republic should exercise her powers to the furtherance of the interests of the republic. Second, any one exercising state prerogatives should recuse themselves, if the exercise of their prerogatives will directly impact on their personal interest. Now there is no law that should actually say so in order for this presumption to be valid. There are so many presumptions at law that we take without having to demand that they be written before they are valid. To demand that everything in law should be written first before it takes effect would be tantamount to threatening our democratic civilization itself.

Bo Nchito has been accused of heinous crimes against individuals and the state. That being the case, we must follow through the law and let the courts deal with these cases. If not for any other reason, it should be offensive to public morality for a DPP to enter a nolle in a case that involves his or her own alleged crimes. The letter of the text of the law has given powers to the DPP to discontinue prosecutions of any criminal matter. But the law never envisaged a situation where the DPP would discontinue a matter that involves her own alleged personal crimes. However, in the specific case of Mutembo Nchito, we all should be patient enough to hear what the Magistrate Court will finally rule on the matter.

Nchito should stop hiding behind bombasa - Munshya wa Munshya

Nchito should stop hiding behind bombasa – Munshya wa Munshya

When people demand that Bo Mutembo should account for his alleged criminal activities, they should be taken seriously. Mutembo and his cartel did well to go beyond the business of running a law firm to the business of running airlines. Good for them, they diversified. However, we should be firm in our demand that those who want to run airlines, law chambers or mines should do so with a specter of integrity. Regardless of how many airplanes you acquire, if you are using stolen money, it cannot be good for the county. As we used to say in Chiwempala, “zimya neighbor” using “indalama isha kwiba” does not help in the long run. Here is what Bo Mutembo should do. Stop hiding behind the bombasa of nolle prosequi. We have had presidents in this country whose bombasa got stripped and they had to account for their alleged crimes. These presidents commanded our soldiers, ruled over the police, and all the million guns in our country quivered at their signature. What makes Bo Mutembo think that he could get away from the people’s process using a “nolle”? There have been great men and women in this country who have had their day in court. Bushe bena tabali bantu? What makes Mr. Zimya Neighbour think that he can get away with these allegations? The best way to beat these allegations is not by all this “nolle” nonsense, but rather by accounting to the people of Zambia. Zambians have some questions. Bushe indalama sha ndeke shali sha kwiba? What about the court judgment, did you falsify it? When you became DPP did you know that you had stolen “katundu” from the Zambian people? When trying to convict Chiluba and his friends, did you cook some evidence? These are some questions our people are asking. And it is only right that they get an answer even if that answer has to be whispered in court. Bo Mutembo, please save us the drama and take off that bombasa, tafiweme!

President Lungu

President Lungu

President Edgar Lungu is now Head of State. He should act quickly in matters that threaten national integrity. It is not right for His Excellency to ignore this matter when there is some evidence, at face value, that suggest some crimes may have been committed by the occupant of a constitutional office. President Lungu should not be ruling through “slow motion”. There are decisions in this country that must be made before making trips to Addis Ababa, Cape Town or Mfuwe. If he can’t act on this serious matter, we should all doubt his seriousness to fight corruption and rein in a cartel that went berserk dogging allegations of crimes, theft, and corruption.

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Suggested Citation: Munshya, E. (2015). “Indecent Discretion: Why Nchito’s “nolle” defies both law and common sense”. Elias Munshya Blog (www.eliasmunshya.org) February 2015

No Creativity, No Imagination: My reflections on President Lungu’s cabinet

E. Munshya, LLB (Hons), M.Div.

President Lungu

President Lungu

For someone who took almost three weeks to announce the cabinet, it is rather surprising that this cabinet has very few surprises. Unprecedented in the history of our nation, Edgar Lungu becomes the first president to take 19 days to announce a full cabinet. What is equally unusual with Lungu is the fact that by the time he was taking his oath of office, he had already worked for about three years as a minister and as a Member of Parliament. So Edgar Lungu was much more familiar with more MPs than any of the previous presidents. Kenneth Kaunda had known and personally worked with most of the people he appointed as ministers in 1964, but he never took long to identify a cabinet. Chiluba had a fleeting personal knowledge of the MPs, and yet he appointed cabinet just a day after he assumed power. Mwanawasa appointed a full cabinet within days. He most certainly retained Chiluba’s ministers, but added a few individuals here and there. Rupiah Banda in 2008 also kept Mwanawasa’s cabinet but appointed a full cabinet just days after taking the oath. President Sata took slightly a week to form his team.

We can only speculate as to why Lungu took 19 days to form his full team. But looking at the ministers, it becomes quite apparent that the team offers nothing new. With the exception of a few faces, this team remains hugely uneventful.

Emmanuel Mwamba

Emmanuel Mwamba

By far, the most daring of these appointments is Chishimba Kambwili as Minister of Information. Kambwili has not fared very well in ministries that have to do with tact and diplomacy. His first job as Minister of Foreign Affairs in 2011 ended in disaster. His stint at Labour was equally uninspiring. During the run up to the elections late last-year, Kambwili stormed ZNBC studios to protest ZNBC’s editorial choice. This was when Kambwili was Team Guy Scott and not Team Edgar Lungu. It is quite surprising that President Lungu has found Kambwili suitable to take over this portfolio. The selection of Kambwili though might be sending a message that Lungu is willing to put a fighter at information who will dictate news and information for the 2016 election cycle. Kambwili has several strengths. He is a great organizer, having created the Team7500, which served as his own campaign team for Lungu in the just ended election. In addition, Kambwili has turned out to be good with social media. In fact, he used his page on Facebook to organize this Team7500. For sure, both the PF and its government would do with a good social media strategy in this age where news is being dictated by likes, tweets, hashtags and shares.

Vincent Mwale - Youth and Sport

Vincent Mwale – Youth and Sport

Kambwili’s appointment is also quite ironic. During the PF squabbles, Kambwili was quite outspoken about his disapproval of Lungu and his team. In fact, the storming of ZNBC happened during that same time. On the other side of Team Lungu was Emmanuel Mwamba, a social media and public relations guru who castigated Kambwili for intimidating journalists at ZNBC. Many expected Mwamba to play some role in Lungu’s government with regard to information, news, or public relations. It is ironic that Lungu has completely sidelined Mwamba, but goes to appoint Kambwili as Information minister. This is the same Kambwili whose behavior towards journalists was anathema to Lungu’s PR team led by Mwamba.

Vincent Mwale has been a very consistent figure in MMD politics. It is rather startling that it has taken him over a decade to be recognised as Cabinet Minister material. He has been an MP under four of Zambia’s six presidents. It has taken Lungu to recognize his leadership abilities by appointing him Minister of Youth and Sport. This is quite a great choice. I just hope that Mwale will take his zeal to cabinet just like he worked tirelessly as chair of the public accounts committee of Zambia’s parliament.

Given Lubinda was almost certainly going to bounce back. As a cunning politician, he changed sides quickly when it became apparent that Lungu was going to be the PF’s nominee. He campaigned vigorously for Lungu and he has been rewarded with a strategic portfolio – Agriculture. He takes over from one of the most inefficient ministers in the history of Zambia. Lungu has done well to do away with Wilbur Simuusa.

Michael Kaingu has been appointed Minister of Education. In 2011 Sata merged this portfolio with higher education, science and vocational training. As such, it is a huge responsibility for Kaingu. This gentleman seems to be a hard worker and he is likely to do well at education. However, his role in the MMD squabbles creates a doubt in my mind as to his judgment and character.

Lungu stated at one point that he was going to split some ministries. It seems he has backpedaled. It doesn’t make sense to have one minister take care of Works, Supply, Communications and Transport. This ministry needed to be split. I just hope that the President will go ahead with plans and streamline this ministry. Yamfwa Mukanga is a good choice for this portfolio. Education, higher education, vocational training, and science is one other ministry that needs splitting.

The following portfolios should be merged: Gender, Traditional Affairs and Community Development. They take up too much space and could be better streamlined. From the address of President Lungu it appears Professor Nkandu Luo might not take up the Gender portfolio. If she declines, it will mark a remarkable fall for a woman who was the rising star in the PF government. Her fight with Bashi Lubemba has had an effect on her plummeting relevance.

This cabinet has six women out of 21. This makes it one of the least gender-balanced cabinets in our history. It is remarkable though that the Vice-President is a woman. It has about 9 Bemba-speaking members. This makes the Bemba-block the most powerful chunk in the cabinet. It has four Easterners and three from Barotseland. Even though it has about 50% Bemba representation, I have no issues with its tribal composition. The PF remains primarily a Bemba-speaking party.

Munshya wa Munshya

Munshya wa Munshya

Lungu has taken a very comfortable posture. He has not stretched nor challenged himself. He is a lawyer and it seems this has come through the choice of cabinet, bizarrely risk averse. He has fired almost all of the ministers that did not support him during the PF squabbles. He has taken an adversarial stand. This is a bit concerning to me. As president, Lungu needed to appear like the big man that he is by absorbing a few of the ministers from the camp that did not support him. It is woeful that Kapeya, Chenda, Simuusa and Sichinga have not been retained. We know Lungu is the boss, but appointing an “adversary” would have shown his true greatness. For now, Lungu took 19 days to come up with a cabinet that lacks both imagination and ingenuity. But it is too early to tell how this team will perform. I wish them all the best.

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Suggested Citation: Munshya, E. (2015). “No Creativity, No Imagination: My reflections on President Lungu’s cabinet.” Elias Munshya Blog (www.eliasmunshya.org). 12 February 2015

My Tribe Is NOT Zambia: Erasure, tribalism and the challenge of national cohesion

E. Munshya, LLB, M.Div.

To help fight the scourge of tribalism in Zambia, some of our people are buying into several slogans in the hope that these slogans will help build some national cohesion. There is one particular slogan that I find patently problematic. This slogan states, “My tribe is Zambia”. The goal of using this slogan is to try and have the user know or convince others that they are above tribalism by emphasizing the fact that the only tribe that matters, should be the “tribe” called Zambia. I have a problem with such sloganeering, because it really does not help fight tribalism but could actually be used to perpetuate it.

It should be clear that Zambia is not a tribe and it was never meant to be a tribe. Rather it is a republic that is formed by people who belong to different tribes, persuasions and races. As such, there is no way that “Zambia” can fulfill a goal that it was never meant to fulfill in the first place. Zambia has not replaced our ethnic heritage; rather Zambia is a creation of people who already belonged to different ethnic groups. When we say that all these tribes do not really matter and all that matters is “Zambia” we are robbing our nationhood of a clear philosophical basis grounded upon the tribal diversity of this space we now call Zambia.

Munshya wa Munshya

Munshya wa Munshya

Stating, “my tribe is Zambia” has the potential of erasure. The most potent tool against tribalism is not erasure of tribes, but rather the respect for all tribes. That which we fail to do by respect of tribes cannot be achieved through contempt for those tribes. If we cannot respect Tongas and Lozis and Tumbukas, we do no service to the destiny of our country by trying to erase the experience of Tongas, Lozis, and Tumbukas. What we need in Zambia is acknowledgement and respect for the “Zambianness” of all tribes. The paramount assumption should be that all tribes contribute equally to the Zambian project. There is no tribe that contributes less to Zambia, but rather that all tribes are part and parcel of the Zambian venture. If we acknowledge that fact, it will lead all of us to a more respectful attitude towards the other. It will make us realise that on our own, we cannot make Zambia, Zambia. It takes the effort of all. And these “all” are the different tribes that make up our nation. It was not the intention of the Republic of Zambia to erase the reality of ethnic diversity, but rather the republic exists as a result of this ethnic diversity.

To fight tribalism in Zambia, we must also interrogate the assumptions exhibited by some of our people. Zambia is not a Bemba country to which they invited other tribes such as the Tongas or Lenjes. Zambia is a diverse nation to which all tribes contribute equally to its subsistence. As such, removing some tribes from national memory does not resolve the tribalism problem it just exacerbates it. All tribes must be visible and none should be assigned to the garbage bin of obliteration.

Zambians should listen to each other. We should listen to how various tribes are experiencing the Zambian promise. We should not shut each other up. If the Zambian project is not working for some of our people, it is time for us to listen to each other without judgment and without threats of “tribal” accusations. To listen to each other, we must draw the discourse from the urban centers of Lusaka and Ndola to the interior of Gwembe and Mapatizya. We should ask each other, do the people of Milenge and Mongu perceive the Zambian project in the same way? Before we accuse any tribe of being more tribal than our tribes, let us take the time to listen to each other. As such, let us take the 2015 elections as a way to begin conversations, not as a way to stop conversations. The people of Southern Province made their voices heard through the ballot, it is time to listen before we accuse.

Zambians should learn to respect each other’s tribes. Respect is predicated on numerous elements. Each of us should love our heritage. We should celebrate our traditions. We should feel free to speak our language and enjoy the intonation inherited from our forefathers. But after we have done that, we will realise how our own heritage is so inadequate to fully express the Zambian spirit. It is this humility that should push us to want to respect the heritage of others. By respecting the culture of others, we are becoming totally Zambian, as Zambia itself is best expressed by the respect we feel for the peoples that comprise its confines. Respect for others means, a Bemba person should have that humbling respect for a Goba and vice-versa. It also means that we take the time to acknowledge that the Zambian greatness lies not in ourselves alone but in the collective effort of all – the others and me. This can best be done in an environment that respects others and not the one that seeks to erase the other.

All political leaders in our country should be aware of the power of tribal balancing. Regardless of how technically astute a cabinet is, I would not support it if it only comprises people belonging to one tribe or region. If Chagwa Lungu dared to appoint an all Nsenga-cabinet, I would be the first one to protest against such an act. Through tribal balancing, you are acknowledging the strength of others and you are also showing our nation that you respect the other. Even God in the Bible asked Joshua and Moses to select 12 men, one from each tribe to perform specific tasks. God balanced tribe in Israel. If tribal balancing was good for Israel, it is surely good for our people.

President Kenneth Kaunda also realized the power of tribal balancing. He deliberately sought to appoint a diverse cabinet. Assuming that he was from Chinsali, he made sure that people belonging to other tribes held the positions of Prime Minister. This was a very powerful way of saying; the Zambian project truly belongs to all. Merit in that case, was clearly supplemented by a touch of balance. It cannot be on merit that which produces a board filled with Bembas alone!

We do misconstrue the One Zambia One Nation motto if we think that it means that “tribes” do not matter. The motto actually is an ideal way of saying that the Republic is a product of various peoples who come together to form it. Such an understanding of One Zambia One Nation, does not lead to erasure, it instead leads to a healthy respect for all. And it is this respect for the other that we all need as we navigate through the challenge of tribalism.

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This article appeared in the print edition of the Zambia Daily Nation on Friday, 30 January 2015.

Suggested citation: Munshya, E. (2015). “My tribe is not Zambia: erasure, tribalism and the challenge of national cohesion”. Elias Munshya Blog (www.eliasmunshya.org) (29 January 2015)

Eliasmunshya.org projects that Lungu wins Zambian elections: 784,263 for EL and 764,724 for HH

  • If you have to copy this table, please make an appropriate acknowledgement of the source. Just cite www.eliasmunshya.org and we will be happy.
  • We do not guarantee the accuracy of these numbers.
  • Final and official numbers will come from the Electoral Commission of Zambia. Some numbers may not be final for constituencies.
  • Use with caution. We are not responsible for your BP, heart attack or anything like that arising out of the use of these numbers.
  • Remember these are projections only, and more accurate numbers will come from the ECZ.
PF UPND
Chisamba Central 2,596 6,597
Chitambo Central 2,534 384
Kapiri Mposhi Central 7,869 8,160
Katuba Central 2,399 6,537
Keembe Central 2,586 9,043
Mkushi North Central 4,153 2,577
Mkushi South Central 2,182 1,734
Muchinga Central 1,384 456
Mumbwa Central 1,392 7,597
Mwembeshi Central 814 7,975
Serenje Central 3,940 839
Bwacha Central 8,182 2,682
Nangoma Central 542 7,783
Kabwe Central Central 11,763 4,957
 eliasmunshya.org 52,336 67,321
Bwana Mkubwa Copperbelt 11,294 3,038
Chifubu Copperbelt 11,817 3,422
Chililabombwe Copperbelt 10,126 3,047
Chimwemwe Copperbelt 15,214 3,499
Chingola Copperbelt 11,750 5,846
Kabushi Copperbelt 12,475 2,762
Kafulafuta Copperbelt 2,241 1,961
Kamfinsa Copperbelt 8,983 2,381
Kantanshi Copperbelt 8,439 1,615
Kwacha Copperbelt 14,940 4,027
Luanshya Copperbelt 9,765 3,145
Kalulushi Copperbelt 11,371 4,040
Masaiti Copperbelt 2,565 3,461
Mpongwe Copperbelt 2,751 1,690
Mufulira Copperbelt 6,755 1,690
Nchanga Copperbelt 11,388 2,666
Ndola Central Copperbelt 12,610 4,662
Nkana Copperbelt 11,608 2,829
Wusakile Copperbelt 11,551 1,969
Roan Copperbelt 7,782 2,445
Lufwanyama Copperbelt 2,270 3,457
Kankoyo Copperbelt 5,226 1,271
 eliasmunshya.org 202,921 64,923
Chadiza Eastern Province 2,927 2,391
Chipangali Eastern Province 4,673 1,750
Chasefu Eastern Province 5,001 1,974
Chipata Central Eastern Province 10,883 3,228
Chama North Eastern Province 3,615 676
Kapoche Eastern Province 4,713 1,115
Kasenengwa Eastern Province 5,336 2,616
Luangeni Eastern Province 5,151 1,716
Lumezi Eastern Province 3,056 1,116
Lundazi Eastern Province 8,779 2,972
Malambo Eastern Province 4,534 2,538
Mkaika Eastern Province 4,051 2,285
Msanzala Eastern Province 3,218 697
Nyimba Eastern Province 2,238 830
Petauke Central Eastern Province 10,346 1,202
Sinda Eastern Province 2,509 3,142
Vubwi Eastern Province 2,111 1,526
Chama South Eastern Province 2,801 908
Milanzi Eastern Province 3,441 1,471
 eliasmunshya.org 89,383 34,153
Bahati Luapula Province 7,163 876
Bangweulu Luapula Province 7,472 848
Chembe Luapula Province 2,597 354
Chiengi Luapula Province 4,773 1,445
Chifunabuli Luapula Province 7,736 1,210
Nchelenge Luapula Province 9,112 952
Chipili Luapula Province 5,689 267
Kawambwa Luapula Province 5,233 374
Luapula Luapula Province 3,527 326
Mambilima Luapula Province 3,714 568
Mansa Central Luapula Province 10,631 1,278
Mwense Luapula Province 5,340 1,055
Pambashe Luapula Province 3,854 519
Mwansabombwe Luapula Province 4,548 421
 eliasmunshya.org 81,389 10,493
Kafue Lusaka Province 7,758 8,108
Feira Lusaka Province 3,332 751
Chilanga Lusaka Province 4,376 6,102
Chongwe Lusaka Province 5,773 7,252
Rufunsa Lusaka Province 1,819 2,146
Chawama Lusaka Province 13,469 6,261
Kabwata Lusaka Province 19,704 10,069
Kanyama Lusaka Province 13,034 12,805
Lusaka Central Lusaka Province 15,077 9,190
Mandevu Lusaka Province 29,244 9,844
Matero Lusaka Province 28,056 9,127
Munali Lusaka Province 27,296 14,366
 eliasmunshya.org 168,938 96,021
Chilubi Northern Province 8,100 2,400
Chinsali Northern Province 8,622 381
Isoka East Northern Province 4,614 992
Isoka West Northern Province 5,114 1,031
Kanchibiya Northern Province 4,527 488
Kaputa Northern Province 4,210 2,110
Kasama Northern Province 11,544 3,465
Lubansenshi Northern Province 5,216 939
Lukashya Northern Province 8,485 1,915
Lunte Northern Province 4,172 1,489
Lupososhi Northern Province 7,633 1,147
Malole Northern Province 13,466 1,873
Mbala Northern Province 6,727 1,430
Mfuwe Northern Province 3,102 144
Mporokoso Northern Province 4,315 683
Mpulungu Northern Province 8,151 2,015
Nakonde Northern Province 6,693 1,370
Senga Hill Northern Province 5,537 1,092
Shiwa Ng’andu Northern Province 6,228 222
Chimbamilonga Northern Province 4,175 1,533
Mpika Central Northern Province 7,204 572
 eliasmunshya.org 137,835 27,291
Chavuma North-Western 792 4,898
Kabompo East North-Western 826 6,739
Kabompo West North-Western 520 6,307
Mufumbwe North-Western 1,200 8,400
Mwinilunga East North-Western 537 6,515
Mwinilunga West North-Western 822 19,152
Solwezi Central North-Western 4,219 14,737
Solwezi East North-Western 597 2,584
Solwezi West North-Western 618 9,312
Zambezi East North-Western 900 8,333
Zambezi West North-Western 888 1,600
Kasempa North-Western 622 9,486
 eliasmunshya.org 12,541 98,063
Bweengwa Southern Province 105 12,593
Chikankata Southern Province 471 12,457
Choma Southern Province 2,139 21,921
Dundumwenzi Southern Province 83 14,181
Gwembe Southern Province 249 10,960
Itezhi-Tezhi Southern Province 788 7,069
Kalomo Central Southern Province 662 17,961
Mapatizya Southern Province 357 13,874
Katombola Southern Province 466 15,025
Livingstone Southern Province 8,352 19,125
Magoye Southern Province 428 11,734
Mazabuka Central Southern Province 3,092 14,801
Mbabala Southern Province 128 13,629
Monze Southern Province 1,097 21,385
Moomba Southern Province 100 8,276
Namwala Southern Province 440 17,151
Pemba Southern Province 203 13,338
Siavonga Southern Province 1,361 12,817
Sinazongwe Southern Province 1,103 17,942
 eliasmunshya.org 21,624 276,239
Kalabo Central Western Province 1,271 6,495
Kaoma Central Western Province 912 4,886
Liuwa Western Province 528 4,685
Luampa Western Province 1,449 5,251
Luena Western Province 326 3,044
Lukulu West Western Province 876 7,163
Mongu Central Western Province 1,959 11,483
Nalikwanda Western Province 445 4,591
Nalolo Western Province 1,536 5,069
Senanga Western Province 754 5,861
Sesheke Western Province 566 5,103
Sikongo Western Province 1,207 4,194
Sinjembela Western Province 1,378 6,389
Mwandi Western Province 596 2,989
Lukulu East Western Province 1,293 5,708
Mulobezi Western Province 1,063 3,517
Mangango Western Province 1,137 3,792
 eliasmunshya.org 17,296 90,220
TOTAL 784,263 764,724
Difference 19,539

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Munshya wa Munshya

Munshya wa Munshya

149 constituencies tabulated: My projection puts Lungu at 786,722 and Hichilema at 757,052

PF UPND
Chisamba Central 2,596 6,597
Chitambo Central 2,534 384
Kapiri Mposhi Central 7,869 8,160
Katuba Central 2,399 6,537
Keembe Central 2,586 9,043
Mkushi North Central 4,153 2,577
Mkushi South Central 2,182 1,734
Muchinga Central 1,384 456
Mumbwa Central 1,392 7,597
Mwembeshi Central 814 7,975
Serenje Central 3,940 839
Bwacha Central 8,182 2,682
Nangoma Central 542 7,783
Kabwe Central Central 11,763 4,957
52,336 67,321
Bwana Mkubwa Copperbelt 11,294 3,038
Chifubu Copperbelt 11,817 3,422
Chililabombwe Copperbelt 10,126 3,047
Chimwemwe Copperbelt 15,214 3,499
Chingola Copperbelt 11,750 5,846
Kabushi Copperbelt 12,475 2,762
Kafulafuta Copperbelt 2,241 1,961
Kamfinsa Copperbelt 8,983 2,381
Kantanshi Copperbelt 8,439 1,615
Kwacha Copperbelt 14,940 4,027
Luanshya Copperbelt 9,765 3,145
Kalulushi Copperbelt 11,371 4,040
Masaiti Copperbelt 2,565 3,461
Mpongwe Copperbelt 2,751 1,690
Mufulira Copperbelt 6,755 1,690
Nchanga Copperbelt 11,388 2,666
Ndola Central Copperbelt 12,610 4,662
Nkana Copperbelt 11,608 2,829
Wusakile Copperbelt 11,551 1,969
Roan Copperbelt 7,782 2,445
Lufwanyama Copperbelt 2,270 3,457
Kankoyo Copperbelt 5,226 1,271
202,921 64,923
Chadiza Eastern Province 2,927 2,391
Chipangali Eastern Province 4,673 1,750
Chasefu Eastern Province 5,001 1,974
Chipata Central Eastern Province 10,883 3,228
Chama North Eastern Province 3,615 676
Kapoche Eastern Province 4,713 1,115
Kasenengwa Eastern Province 5,336 2,616
Luangeni Eastern Province 5,151 1,716
Lumezi Eastern Province 3,056 1,116
Lundazi Eastern Province 8,779 2,972
Malambo Eastern Province 4,534 2,538
Mkaika Eastern Province 4,051 2,285
Msanzala Eastern Province 3,218 697
Nyimba Eastern Province 2,238 830
Petauke Central Eastern Province 10,346 1,202
Sinda Eastern Province 2,509 3,142
Vubwi Eastern Province 2,111 1,526
Chama South Eastern Province 2,801 908
Milanzi Eastern Province 3,441 1,471
89,383 34,153
Bahati Luapula Province 7,163 876
Bangweulu Luapula Province 7,472 848
Chembe Luapula Province 2,597 354
Chiengi Luapula Province 4,773 1,445
Chifunabuli Luapula Province 7,736 1,210
Nchelenge Luapula Province 9,112 952
Chipili Luapula Province 5,689 267
Kawambwa Luapula Province 5,233 374
Luapula Luapula Province 3,527 326
Mambilima Luapula Province 3,714 568
Mansa Central Luapula Province 10,631 1,278
Mwense Luapula Province 5,340 1,055
Pambashe Luapula Province 3,854 519
Mwansabombwe Luapula Province 4,548 421
81,389 10,493
Kafue Lusaka Province 7,758 8,108
Feira Lusaka Province 3,332 751
Chilanga Lusaka Province 4,376 6,102
Chongwe Lusaka Province 5,773 7,252
Rufunsa Lusaka Province 1,819 2,146
Chawama Lusaka Province 13,469 6,261
Kabwata Lusaka Province 19,704 10,069
Kanyama Lusaka Province 13,034 12,805
Lusaka Central Lusaka Province 15,077 9,190
Mandevu Lusaka Province 29,244 9,844
Matero Lusaka Province 28,056 9,127
Munali Lusaka Province 27,296 14,366
168,938 96,021
Chilubi Northern Province 8,100 2,400
Chinsali Northern Province 8,622 381
Isoka East Northern Province 4,614 992
Isoka West Northern Province 5,114 1,031
Kanchibiya Northern Province 4,527 488
Kaputa Northern Province 4,210 2,110
Kasama Northern Province 11,544 3,465
Lubansenshi Northern Province 5,216 939
Lukashya Northern Province 8,485 1,915
Lunte Northern Province 4,172 1,489
Lupososhi Northern Province 7,633 1,147
Malole Northern Province 13,466 1,873
Mbala Northern Province 6,727 1,430
Mfuwe Northern Province 3,102 144
Mporokoso Northern Province 4,315 683
Mpulungu Northern Province 8,151 2,015
Nakonde Northern Province 6,693 1,370
Senga Hill Northern Province 5,537 1,092
Shiwa Ng’andu Northern Province 6,228 222
Chimbamilonga Northern Province 4,175 1,533
Mpika Central Northern Province 7,204 572
137,835 27,291
Chavuma North-Western 792 4,898
Kabompo East North-Western 826 6,739
Kabompo West North-Western 520 6,307
Mufumbwe North-Western 1,200 8,400
Mwinilunga East North-Western 537 6,515
Mwinilunga West North-Western 822 19,152
Solwezi Central North-Western 4,219 14,737
Solwezi East North-Western 597 2,584
Solwezi West North-Western 618 9,312
Zambezi East North-Western 900 8,333
Zambezi West North-Western 888 1,600
Kasempa North-Western 622 9,486
12,541 98,063
Bweengwa Southern Province 105 12,593
Chikankata Southern Province 471 12,457
Choma Southern Province 2,139 21,921
Dundumwenzi Southern Province 83 14,181
Gwembe Southern Province 249 10,960
Itezhi-Tezhi Southern Province 788 7,069
Kalomo Central Southern Province 662 17,961
Mapatizya Southern Province 357 13,874
Katombola Southern Province 466 15,025
Livingstone Southern Province 8,352 19,125
Magoye Southern Province 428 11,734
Mazabuka Central Southern Province 3,092 14,801
Mbabala Southern Province 128 13,629
Monze Southern Province 1,097 21,385
Moomba Southern Province 100 8,276
Namwala Southern Province 440 17,151
Pemba Southern Province 203 13,338
Siavonga Southern Province 1,361 12,817
Sinazongwe Southern Province 1,103 17,942
21,624 276,239
Kalabo Central Western Province 1,271 6,495
Kaoma Central Western Province 912 4,886
Liuwa Western Province - -
Luampa Western Province 1,449 5,251
Luena Western Province 326 3,044
Lukulu West Western Province 876 7,163
Mongu Central Western Province 1,959 11,483
Nalikwanda Western Province 445 4,591
Nalolo Western Province 1,536 5,069
Senanga Western Province 754 5,861
Sesheke Western Province 566 5,103
Sikongo Western Province 4,194 1,207
Sinjembela Western Province 1,378 6,389
Mwandi Western Province 596 2,989
Lukulu East Western Province 1,293 5,708
Mulobezi Western Province 1,063 3,517
Mangango Western Province 1,137 3,792
19,755 82,548
TOTAL 786,722 757,052
29,670

If you have to copy this table, please make an appropriate acknowledgement of the source. Just cite www.eliasmunshya.org and we will be happy. We do not guarantee the accuracy of these numbers. Final and official numbers will come from the Electoral Commission of Zambia. Some numbers are not final for constituencies – Munshya wa Munshya Like me on Facebook and join me on twitter to continue the conversation. #ZambiaForward #OneZambiaOneNation #IfintuNiLungu #AleisaAleisa

Zambia Election Results: Lungu is at 657,929 HH is at 540,596 from our tabulations so far

 www.eliasmunshya.org PF UPND
Chisamba Central - -
Chitambo Central 2,534 384
Kapiri Mposhi Central - -
Katuba Central 2,099 5,809
Keembe Central - -
Mkushi North Central 4,153 2,577
Mkushi South Central 680 980
Muchinga Central 1,384 456
Mumbwa Central - -
Mwembeshi Central - -
Serenje Central 3,940 839
Bwacha Central 8,182 2,682
Nangoma Central 542 7,783
Kabwe Central Central 11,763 4,957
40,277 26,467
Bwana Mkubwa Copperbelt 11,294 3,038
Chifubu Copperbelt 11,817 3,422
Chililabombwe Copperbelt 10,126 2,780
Chimwemwe Copperbelt 15,214 3,499
Chingola Copperbelt 11,750 5,846
Kabushi Copperbelt 12,475 2,762
Kafulafuta Copperbelt 2,241 1,961
Kamfinsa Copperbelt 8,983 2,381
Kantanshi Copperbelt 8,439 1,615
Kwacha Copperbelt 14,940 4,027
Luanshya Copperbelt 9,765 3,145
Kalulushi Copperbelt 11,371 4,040
Masaiti Copperbelt 2,565 3,461
Mpongwe Copperbelt 2,751 1,690
Mufulira Copperbelt 6,755 1,690
Nchanga Copperbelt 11,388 2,666
Ndola Central Copperbelt 12,610 4,662
Nkana Copperbelt 11,608 2,829
Wusakile Copperbelt 11,551 1,969
Roan Copperbelt 7,782 2,445
Lufwanyama Copperbelt - -
Kankoyo Copperbelt 8,439 1,615
203,864 61,543
Chadiza Eastern Province 2,927 2,391
Chipangali Eastern Province 4,673 1,750
Chasefu Eastern Province 5,001 1,974
Chipata Central Eastern Province 10,883 3,228
Chama North Eastern Province - -
Kapoche Eastern Province 4,713 1,115
Kasenengwa Eastern Province 5,336 2,616
Luangeni Eastern Province - -
Lumezi Eastern Province - -
Lundazi Eastern Province 8,779 2,972
Malambo Eastern Province 3,157 1,627
Mkaika Eastern Province 4,051 2,285
Msanzala Eastern Province - -
Nyimba Eastern Province 2,238 830
Petauke Central Eastern Province 2,069 489
Sinda Eastern Province 2,509 3,142
Vubwi Eastern Province 2,111 1,526
Chama South Eastern Province - -
Milanzi Eastern Province 3,441 1,471
61,888 27,416
Bahati Luapula Province 7,163 876
Bangweulu Luapula Province 7,472 848
Chembe Luapula Province 2,597 354
Chiengi Luapula Province - -
Chifunabuli Luapula Province 7,736 1,210
Nchelenge Luapula Province - -
Chipili Luapula Province 5,689 267
Kawambwa Luapula Province 5,233 374
Luapula Luapula Province - -
Mambilima Luapula Province 3,714 568
Mansa Central Luapula Province 10,631 1,278
Mwense Luapula Province 5,340 1,055
Pambashe Luapula Province 3,854 519
Mwansabombwe Luapula Province 4,548 421
63,977 7,770
Kafue Lusaka Province 7,758 8,108
Feira Lusaka Province 3,332 751
Chilanga Lusaka Province 4,376 6,102
Chongwe Lusaka Province 5,773 6,853
Rufunsa Lusaka Province - -
Chawama Lusaka Province 13,469 6,261
Kabwata Lusaka Province 19,704 10,069
Kanyama Lusaka Province 13,034 9,281
Lusaka Central Lusaka Province 15,077 9,190
Mandevu Lusaka Province 29,244 9,844
Matero Lusaka Province 28,056 9,127
Munali Lusaka Province 27,296 14,366
167,119 89,952
Chilubi Northern Province - -
Chinsali Northern Province 8,622 381
Isoka East Northern Province 5,114 1,031
Isoka West Northern Province - -
Kanchibiya Northern Province 1,686 284
Kaputa Northern Province 4,210 2,110
Kasama Northern Province 11,544 3,465
Lubansenshi Northern Province 5,216 939
Lukashya Northern Province 6,545 1,405
Lunte Northern Province - -
Lupososhi Northern Province 3,005 510
Malole Northern Province 10,509 1,528
Mbala Northern Province 2,586 549
Mfuwe Northern Province - -
Mporokoso Northern Province - -
Mpulungu Northern Province 8,151 2,015
Nakonde Northern Province 6,693 1,370
Senga Hill Northern Province - -
Shiwa Ng’andu Northern Province 3,954 262
Chimbamilonga Northern Province 4,175 1,533
Mpika Central Northern Province 7,204 572
89,214 17,954
Chavuma North-Western 900 7,000
Kabompo East North-Western 824 6,721
Kabompo West North-Western 528 6,504
Mufumbwe North-Western - -
Mwinilunga East North-Western 537 6,515
Mwinilunga West North-Western 881 18,001
Solwezi Central North-Western 4,219 14,737
Solwezi East North-Western - -
Solwezi West North-Western - -
Zambezi East North-Western 900 8,333
Zambezi West North-Western 888 1,600
Kasempa North-Western 622 9,486
10,299 78,897
Bweengwa Southern Province 79 10,487
Chikankata Southern Province 471 12,457
Choma Southern Province 2,139 21,921
Dundumwenzi Southern Province - -
Gwembe Southern Province - -
Itezhi-Tezhi Southern Province - -
Kalomo Central Southern Province 590 10,297
Mapatizya Southern Province 357 13,874
Katombola Southern Province - -
Livingstone Southern Province 8,352 19,125
Magoye Southern Province - -
Mazabuka Central Southern Province 3,092 14,801
Mbabala Southern Province 126 13,629
Monze Southern Province 1,097 21,385
Moomba Southern Province 100 8,276
Namwala Southern Province 440 17,151
Pemba Southern Province 203 13,338
Siavonga Southern Province 1,361 12,817
Sinazongwe Southern Province - -
18,407 189,558
Kalabo Central Western Province - -
Kaoma Central Western Province 912 4,886
Liuwa Western Province - -
Luampa Western Province 369 1,665
Luena Western Province 326 3,044
Lukulu West Western Province - -
Mongu Central Western Province 1,959 11,483
Nalikwanda Western Province - -
Nalolo Western Province - -
Senanga Western Province - -
Sesheke Western Province 566 5,103
Sikongo Western Province - -
Sinjembela Western Province - -
Mwandi Western Province 596 2,989
Lukulu East Western Province 1,293 5,708
Mulobezi Western Province 846 2,901
Mangango Western Province 1,017 3,260
7,884 41,039
 www.eliasmunshya.org
TOTAL 657,929 540,596

If you have to copy this table, please make an appropriate acknowledgement of the source. Just cite www.eliasmunshya.org and we will be happy. We do not guarantee the accuracy of these numbers. Final and official numbers will come from the Electoral Commission of Zambia. Some numbers are not final for constituencies – Munshya wa Munshya

Like me on Facebook and join me on twitter to continue the conversation. #ZambiaForward #OneZambiaOneNation #IfintuNiLungu #AleisaAleisa

Current update Lungu 512,479 while HH has 359,106 – #ZambiaDecides

(copyright – eliasmunshya.org, 2015) PF UPND
Chisamba Central 0 0
Chitambo Central 0 0
Kapiri Mposhi Central 0 0
Katuba Central 0 0
Keembe Central 0 0
Mkushi North Central 0 0
Mkushi South Central 0 0
Muchinga Central 0 0
Mumbwa Central 0 0
Mwembeshi Central 0 0
Serenje Central 0 0
Bwacha Central 0 0
Nangoma Central 0 0
Kabwe Central Central 11763 4957
Bwana Mkubwa Copperbelt 11294 3038
Chifubu Copperbelt 11817 3422
Chililabombwe Copperbelt 10126 2780
Chimwemwe Copperbelt 15214 3499
Chingola Copperbelt 11750 5846
Kabushi Copperbelt 12475 2762
Kafulafuta Copperbelt 0 0
Kamfinsa Copperbelt 8983 2381
Kantanshi Copperbelt 8439 1615
Kwacha Copperbelt 14940 4027
Luanshya Copperbelt 9765 3145
Kalulushi Copperbelt 11371 4040
Masaiti Copperbelt – (eliasmunshya.org)
Mpongwe Copperbelt
Mufulira Copperbelt 6755 1690
Nchanga Copperbelt 11388 2666
Ndola Central Copperbelt 12610 4662
Nkana Copperbelt 11608 2829
Wusakile Copperbelt 11551 1969
Roan Copperbelt 7782 2445
Lufwanyama Copperbelt
Kankoyo Copperbelt
Chadiza Eastern Province 2927 2391
Chipangali Eastern Province 4673 1750
Chasefu Eastern Province
Chipata Central Eastern Province 10883 3228
Feira Eastern Province
Kapoche Eastern Province
Kasenengwa Eastern Province
Luangeni Eastern Province
Lumezi Eastern Province
Lundazi Eastern Province
Malambo Eastern Province 3157 1627
Mkaika Eastern Province
Msanzala Eastern Province
Nyimba Eastern Province
Petauke Central Eastern Province
Sinda Eastern Province 2509 3142
Vubwi Eastern Province
Chama South Eastern Province
Milanzi Eastern Province
Bahati Luapula Province
Bangweulu Luapula Province 7472 848
Chembe Luapula Province 2597 354
Chiengi Luapula Province
Chifunabuli Luapula Province
Nchelenge Luapula Province
Chipili Luapula Province 5689 267
Kawambwa Luapula Province 5233 374
Luapula Luapula Province
Mambilima Luapula Province 3714 568
Mansa Central Luapula Province 10631 1278
Mwense Luapula Province 3714 588
Pambashe Luapula Province 3854 519
Mwansabombwe Luapula Province 4548 421
Kafue Lusaka Province
Feira Lusaka Province 3732 751
Chilanga Lusaka Province 6410 4321
Chongwe Lusaka Province 5773 6853
Rufunsa Lusaka Province
Chawama Lusaka Province 18469 6261
Kabwata Lusaka Province 19704 10069
Kanyama Lusaka Province 31508 2536
Lusaka Central Lusaka Province 15077 9190
Mandevu Lusaka Province 29244 9844
Matero Lusaka Province 28056 9127
Munali Lusaka Province 27296 14366
Chilubi Northern Province
Chinsali Northern Province 8622 381
Isoka East Northern Province 5114 1031
Isoka West Northern Province
Kanchibiya Northern Province
Kaputa Northern Province
Kasama Northern Province 11544 3465
Lubansenshi Northern Province
Lukashya Northern Province
Lunte Northern Province
Lupososhi Northern Province
Malole Northern Province
Mbala Northern Province
Mfuwe Northern Province
Mporokoso Northern Province
Mpulungu Northern Province
Nakonde Northern Province
Senga Hill Northern Province
Shiwa Ng’andu Northern Province
Chimbamilonga Northern Province 4175 1533
Mpika Central Northern Province
Chavuma North-Western
Kabompo East North-Western
Kabompo West North-Western
Mufumbwe North-Western
Mwinilunga East North-Western 537 6515
Mwinilunga West North-Western
Solwezi Central North-Western 4219 14737
Solwezi East North-Western
Solwezi West North-Western
Zambezi East North-Western 900 8333
Zambezi West North-Western
Kasempa North-Western
Bweengwa Southern Province 79 10487
Chikankata Southern Province 471 12457
Choma Southern Province 2139 21921
Dundumwenzi Southern Province
Gwembe Southern Province
Itezhi-Tezhi Southern Province
Kalomo Central Southern
Mapatizya Southern Province 357 13874
Katombola Southern Province
Livingstone Southern Province 8352 19125
Magoye Southern Province
Mazabuka Central Southern Province 3092 14801
Mbabala Southern Province 126 12996
Monze Southern Province 1045 14727
Moomba Southern Province 100 8276
Namwala Southern Province
Pemba Southern Province 203 13338
Siavonga Southern Province 1361 12817
Sinazongwe Southern Province
Kalabo Central Western Province
Kaoma Central Western Province
Liuwa Western Province
Luampa Western Province
Luena Western Province
Lukulu West Western Province
Mongu Central Western Province 1959 11483
Nalikwanda Western Province
Nalolo Western Province
Senanga Western Province
Sesheke Western Province 566 5103
Sikongo Western Province
Sinjembela Western Province
Mwandi Western Province
Lukulu East Western Province
Mulobezi Western Province
Mangango Western Province 1017 3260
TOTAL (eliasmunshya.org) 512,479 359,106

We welcome people copying these tabulations. But please acknowledge the source as http://www.eliasmunshya.org. Thank you!!!!

Munshya wa Munshya

Munshya wa Munshya